Jean-Yves Sixt You Tube Lessons



Jean-Yves Sixt You Tube Lessons

Postby maugein96 » Wed Nov 30, 2016 11:24 pm

It seems that one or two forum members have decided to try these lessons out for C system CBA, but are having difficulty with the French language.

He uses the standard French "Solfege" terminology for the keys, and here is a very brief comparison chart. It really is as simple as Do-Re-Mi, but there is a catch, when it comes to the key of B:-

C = Do
D = Re
E = Mi
F= Fah
G= Sol (l is silent)
A= Lah
B= Si (not to be confused with the key of C)
Flat= Bemol (baymol)
Sharp= Diese (Dee-ess)
Major= majeur (Mah Your)
Minor= mineur (Meenoor)
Thumb= Pouce (puss, but not your pet cat!)

I'm sure he will appreciate our interest in his lessons, even if we don't understand everything he says.

He is one of many Swiss players from the area around Martigny who are obviously French speaking, and therefore tend to use French teaching methods and CBA accordions, although not exclusively.

Any other problems with his terminology just ask on this thread and if I cannot translate it for you, I'll sure as hell have a good guess at it!

In another post I said he had studied with Freddy Balta, a legendary Swiss accordionist. I got that wrong. Balta was actually French, and was the first ever world champion accordionist in 1938 when the competition was held in Paris, Balta's home ground. Freddy Balta was primarily a classical player who also played French musette, often accompanied by a full orchestra. He frequently played on a Hohner Morino with the bassetti bass system (three free bass rows in addition to the normal 6 row Stradella basses). I recently had to ask for assistance to identify that bass layout on the forum, claiming I had never seen it before. Jim D and Jerry PH answered my query, but it turns out I had actually seen a photo of Balta playing a Hohner with that very bass arrangement. I just couldn't remember having seen it (old age is a funny thing).
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Re: Jean-Yves Sixt You Tube Lessons

Postby losthobos » Sat Dec 03, 2016 5:17 pm

Whilst watching lesson 10 I noticed that Jean offers a pdf sheet of this lesson
You only need ask for it in the comments section of he kindly sends..what a gentleman
Right or wrong make it strong...when in doubt miss it out...
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Re: Jean-Yves Sixt You Tube Lessons

Postby mitchnc » Sat Dec 03, 2016 5:54 pm

Link here, so you don't have to wade through the other thread:

https://www.youtube.com/user/yvesmusette
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Re: Jean-Yves Sixt You Tube Lessons

Postby maugein96 » Sat Dec 03, 2016 5:58 pm

Yes, he really is a gentleman. When I first saw the lessons I thought we'd get a few as a taster then be required to sign up for a course with fees etc. Glad I was wrong there.

He is just pushing 70 years of age and was a teacher until the late 80s when he began to concentrate on recording and performing. Most of his recordings were played on instruments (both French and Italian) with full three voice musette, and he is also prone to shove the accordion aside and start singing.

Believe it or not I'm not really into his playing style, but these videos show that he is an excellent teacher. He often tells you that there may be another way to play certain things, and in my opinion that is one of his qualities. He doesn't force you to do things to a rigid regime, and respects the fact that the CBA can be played with different fingering.

This reinforces my belief that CBA methods are really only a grounding to get you started so you don't end up with your fingers all over the place, especially on a 5 row. What you ultimately do with it is only limited by your own ability and knowledge of the keyboard. When I bought my first accordion, which was a CBA, one of the shop staff asked me what I intended to achieve with it. My answer to him was "I just want to play it". It took me several years to consider all of the arguments regarding thumb use, fingering systems, whether the couplers should be on the back or front, what was the best treble button size, the relative qualities of B vs C system, etc. etc. etc. I just wanted to play tunes on the accordion I had bought, although because of all the tittle tattle regarding the right and wrong ways it was a long time before I felt confident with the playing style I eventually ended up with.

If I had a teacher like Jean-Yves, I probably wouldn't have the time to post on here, as I reckon I'd have at least made semi-pro. Video lessons and pdf files arrived too late for me, but I hope younger players take advantage of everything they can to make themselves better musicians.
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