Another question

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Happy girl
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Another question

Post by Happy girl » Mon Feb 06, 2017 8:18 pm

In this piece there are 9 bars which have held notes in the treble, & dotted crotchets in the bass.

My question is where is it possible within these bars to change bellows cleanly? I have tried playing the whole sequence without a change, but the bellows are too far out for comfort.

Maybe this is a good place & time to start practicing tight bellow control?

Also what does the squiggly line mean at the end of the piece, would that be bellow shake or maybe a glissando?

Thank you in advance.
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Reedwarbler
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Re: Another question

Post by Reedwarbler » Mon Feb 06, 2017 8:31 pm

Sqiggly line= The chord is played as a sequence of notes. It is arpeggiated.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arpeggio" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

JIM D.
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Re: Another question

Post by JIM D. » Mon Feb 06, 2017 9:59 pm

It is possible to change the direction of your bellows with no noticeable break in sound or volume change, and many classical accordionist's use this when necessary.
It takes time and practice to achieve the process, but once learned you will find it as easy as bellows shaking.
To accomplish this try holding a treble note while opening the bellows, then while still opening, lift the bottom of the bellows while changing to a closing stroke. You will have to practice this slowly at first, but with time and patience it can be accomplished. :tup:
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Re: Another question

Post by Glenn » Mon Feb 06, 2017 10:21 pm

Are you able to achieve this effect Jim?
Unless both pull and push valves are open at the same time I can't see how it will work.


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Matt Butcher
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Re: Another question

Post by Matt Butcher » Mon Feb 06, 2017 11:56 pm

Changing bellows at the start of the sixth bar of the section would work wouldn't it? Or at the start of the 4th but more risk of running out of bellows? Or three three-bar phrases though that might be a bit artificial. Apologies if I've missed something. (Edited to clarify: when I say "the section" I'm talking about the nine bars, not the whole page)
Last edited by Matt Butcher on Tue Feb 07, 2017 5:44 am, edited 1 time in total.

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JerryPH
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Re: Another question

Post by JerryPH » Tue Feb 07, 2017 1:14 am

Without looking too closely... suggested changes look easily possible at measures: 6, 13, 16, 24 and 29.
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Re: Another question

Post by JIM D. » Tue Feb 07, 2017 1:16 am

Of course it works, Give it a try. I'll see if I find a Utube video on the subject. Lifting the bellows on a out stroke and while lifting begin to reverse the bellows (doing this properly) will not sound a break in air flow.
Many accomplished accordionist's have perfected this and perform in this manner, and if you try a Utube video of accordionist's like for example - Ludovic Biere or Pino di Mugdino - you can see his bellows direction, but if you don't watch and just listen, you can't tell their use of bellows direction.
For example ---- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R0EktwYEZIg" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false; ---- Watch, then just listen (eyes closed).
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Glenn
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Re: Another question

Post by Glenn » Tue Feb 07, 2017 6:38 am

Somehow not convincing.
I'm still looking for the one - note test.
Play one note only and demonstrate the totally smooth, continuous sound of a single reed playing.
I appreciate and enjoy the great skills some accordionists have at masking direction changes and is something we need to practice every day but the one note continuous playing is a tough one to demonstrate. Fortunately not much music requires a smooth, one note drone
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Re: Another question

Post by rancoman » Mon Jun 05, 2017 11:37 am

I don't think it would be possible SCIENTIFICALLY to change from an in note to an out note flawlessly - there has to be a point, however short, that the 'in' reed stops vibrating and the 'out' one begins, although a really good accordionist might be able to make that point SO short that our ear can't detect it easily.

With good bellows control, one should be able to change direction between ANY two separate notes without interrupting the flow of the music - after all, chromatic button accordionists have to do it all the time, as they don't have the same note on the pull and push of the bellows.

Also, the sound produced by the in and out notes on an accordion are slightly different sounding - the 'in' reed is playing straight into the case of the accordion (a sound chamber) whereas the 'out' reed is playing into the reed block.

The difference can be heard clearly in button accordions on the notes that are available on both pull and push but using different buttons - such as B, which is on the pull in the C row and the push on the B row.

Another one of the many things about which I don't know NEARLY enough!

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Re: Another question

Post by debra » Mon Jun 05, 2017 6:47 pm

Glenn wrote:Somehow not convincing.
I'm still looking for the one - note test.
Play one note only and demonstrate the totally smooth, continuous sound of a single reed playing.
This is impossible, and is not what Jim was suggesting. You can change bellows direction without it being noticeable only when there is no note that should play continuously, and it should also not be during a "legato" run.
The "totally smooth, continuous sound of a single reed playing" while changing bellows direction is simply not possible because the sound needs to jump from one reed to the other reed and however short, it takes time. It is somewhat similar to a violinist changing bow direction during a long note. Not very noticeable but always noticeable nonetheless. Only, for the violinist the same string keeps playing whereas on the accordion one reed needs to stop and the opposite reed needs to start.
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