Alternative Scottish "Folk"

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maugein96
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Alternative Scottish "Folk"

Post by maugein96 » Fri Sep 28, 2018 10:40 pm

Sorry, no accordions, but in the part of Scotland where I'm from relatively few of us were actually Scottish, so we had no traditional folk music. The clue as to why that was is in the surnames of the three performers in the clips.

We latched on to US Country and Western music and claimed it as our own, but our particular version of the Scottish accent gave it its own little twist.

The tune Crying Time by Buck Owens was ripe for that "Lanarkshire Touch". The cynical nature of our culture is very evident in the lyrics of the latter two clips. The first track is an old fashioned pub/club singer, but he still has a local following nevertheless.

Here is Sydney Devine, "The Cleland Cowboy", with his version of the song:-

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RSUhHCC ... dex=6&t=0s

Now "Cryin' Time" was a really bad experience for us in Scotland, because the pubs used to close at 2200, and when the barman "Cried time", that meant Last Orders. We use the word "cry" for "call". "What do you cry that?" = "What do you call that?"

Anyway, here is Billy Connolly's version, which used to feature a video of drunk men trying to stagger home after they had been thrown out of the pub at Closing Time. He is doing a take on Scottish pub singers, who would get progressively more drunk as the evening went on.

http://www.famousfix.com/topic/billy-co ... cryin-time

When The Beatles knocked Country and Western into touch, we weren't deterred.

Here is Matt McGinn with "Glaswegian Would", based on the lesser known "Norwegian Wood", by the Beatles. Matt's accent is old fashioned Glasgow.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=deRfvIevWLQ

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Eddy Yates
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Re: Alternative Scottish "Folk"

Post by Eddy Yates » Sat Oct 27, 2018 2:41 pm

Maug,
A good “chune” is a good tune and a good “sanger” is a good singer, eh? Crying Time sung by Devine is right up there with Ray Charles.
Couldn’t understand a single word McGinn sang, though!
I remember eating lunch in a place near our hotel when we played The Celtic Connection in Glasgow, and when I paid, I couldn’t understand what the counterman said. He called in two more employees and I couldn’t understand them either, so I just handed him a wad of money and said, “Keep it!”
Bugari “Blue 72”, Tiger Combo ‘Cordion

maugein96
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Re: Alternative Scottish "Folk"

Post by maugein96 » Sat Oct 27, 2018 3:39 pm

Eddy,

The Glasgow accent is all but impossible to comprehend for non Scots, and is even difficult for those of us who lived near the area, which I did for 20 years. They make no concessions to visitors at all, as it is regarded as a weakness in character to alter the accent, which has been described as sounding like two dogs snarling at each other in the street. Most UK city accents are pretty "thick" and take a bit of listening to. "Chune" is about right, although not sure about "sanger", that's new on me. There are a lot of different Scottish accents, and the Glasgow accent has been heavily influenced by the arrival of thousands of Irish immigrants, mainly from Ulster, over the centuries. It's like the "Boston" of Scotland. The Ulster influence actually gives Glasgow and the surrounding area a slightly more "English" flavour than you'll find in other parts of Scotland.

McGinn's type of accent is only rarely heard these days, as with each passing generation it gets watered down. He was very much a "home grown" product of Glasgow and never really made much attempt at being promoted elsewhere.

Sydney Devine was a bit of a joke, as he often sang just a bit out of tune. He publicly stated that he didn't rate himself as a good singer, but he had quite a following, as country music is popular in the west of Scotland and Ireland.

Connolly ended up becoming one of the very people his act use to mock on stage in his early years, but it was inevitable, as he became an unwitting "victim" of his own success.

All three men have Irish surnames, which illustrates Glasgow's Irish influence. I was born in Glasgow, but have scarcely a drop of Scottish blood.

This is how they speak in Newcastle upon Tyne, which is England's northernmost big city, and not far from where I now live. I was listening to this guy, Gavin Webster, on Wednesday night at a local venue, and was able to get most of what he said. Newcastle shares quite a lot of "Scottish" words and sayings with us, and their dialect is related to ours. See how you fare:-

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l9TjOST ... rSiZfEFFdB

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Re: Alternative Scottish "Folk"

Post by Corsaire » Sun Oct 28, 2018 7:28 am

As Maugein says, there are many different accents in Scotland, from the soft lilt of the western isles to the sometimes very heavy Glasgow "snarl" that you still find in the shipyards and other industries. Despite being Scottish, when I first worked in Glasgow as a youngster as a temp secretary, I was asked not to come back the following day because I simply could not understand what was being said to me !! But a musical ear was my saviour and I soon picked it up - there were some pretty rough accents in the John Brown shipyards ...

There are many words used in Glasgow which are not necessarily used elsewhere - it's known as the "patter". For example, "wallies" are false teeth (I'm sure this is a very useful to know), "piece" is your packed lunch and "messages" is shopping. It's easy to get confused !

maugein96
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Re: Alternative Scottish "Folk"

Post by maugein96 » Sun Oct 28, 2018 9:08 am

Sally,

I only lived 8 miles east of the city and the terminology was often vastly different between city types and us. It was the rhyming slang that got me until I got used to it. Eventually I got to know that a "joe" was a hammer, and a "duke" was a file. I would often confuse them with my own Coatbridge Irish rhyming slang. Full of the rhyming slang ethic I went into a shop in Glasgow and bought some sweets to eat with my "piece". Realising I never had enough coins in my pocket, I asked the lady behind the counter if she could change a "County". She stared at me with that hostile Glasgow look they use towards foreigners, until she saw the green £1 note in my hand. Our slang for a pound, or pown, was a "County Down", and she got it after a few seconds.

Her parting comment to me was " s'time youze Irish punters fae Coatbrig larnt tae talk right. Ah cannae unnerstaun hauf ae whit yez ur oan aboot." My reply was "Naebotheratotherham, as they say in Rotherham.", a contemporary catch phrase of the day, and I didn't care if she understood me or not.

I'm glad I no longer live in the area, but the "patter" could be entertaining. I was able to further my studies of the Glasgow dialect when I worked on the buses there for a year. "How de you know whit the right ferr is, you're jist a teuchter!" They could tell we were from beyond the green belt by our accent, and in the east end of Glasgow they could identify us as "Coatbrig Irish", by our tendency to reaffirm our sentences. "You're jist an eejit, so ye ur!" Crazy thing was Coatbridge people had a slightly different accent from us with more Irish in it, but that was inevitable, as they lived 2 miles away!

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