A different Bass

Discuss traditional folk music from the British Isles, including Ireland, here.

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artelagro
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A different Bass

Post by artelagro » Mon Oct 26, 2015 11:18 am

I bought some old music books at a roup last week just to compare the old with more current publications.
The first was some Scottish country dance music and the main changes to a lot of the traditional tunes were on the bass side. To be fair, I think the book was written at a time when the piano ruled the roost and accordions (or accordionists) were still in their infancy. See the following quote:-

In view of the fact that Accordionists who trouble to study Harmony are very much in the minority, and due to the mechanical construction of chord formation on the left-hand keyboard of the Accordion I have found it most practical to adopt the Numerical Bass Notation in these arrangements, for instance, C.E.G.B flat, is not C 7th, as so constantly written in Accordion arrangements, but is actually F 7th, but, in the Numerical Notation it is written as C3, for it is found on the 3rd Bass below C of the Fundamental Row, (in the C row ).

If you are starting to lose the grip of this, Numerical Bass Notation is:-

Counter Bass are Underlined thus:- A. B. C. etc.
Fundamental Bass are written plainly, thus:- A. B. C. etc.
Major Chords are written, thus:- A1. B1. C1. etc.
Minor Chords are written, thus:- A2. B2. C2. etc.

Now you understand.

Next we take a well known tune – ‘the Harvest Home’. Is there anyone here under the age of 90 who recognises this arrangement?

Garth
harvest home.jpg
The Harvest Home

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barkis
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Re: A different Bass

Post by barkis » Mon Oct 26, 2015 5:14 pm

artelagro wrote:C.E.G.B flat, is not C 7th, as so constantly written in Accordion arrangements, but is actually F 7th
How can C E G Bb not be a C7?
artelagro wrote:Is there anyone here under the age of 90 who recognises this arrangement?
No.

artelagro
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Re: A different Bass

Post by artelagro » Mon Oct 26, 2015 8:18 pm

One extra point for being the first to spot it Barkis - well done.
Now there will be a rush to visit Duane Schnur's site to download his chord chart http://duaneschnur.com/accordion/lesson ... -Chord.pdf
But, what did Mozart Allan (the publisher) mean?
Anyone?
Garth

BobM
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Re: A different Bass

Post by BobM » Mon Oct 26, 2015 10:12 pm

What are benefits of this system? The current chord system is well used and understood; this is just another way for Accordionists to be even more disconnected from the mainstream.
There are known knowns. These are things we know that we know. There are known unknowns. That is to say, there are things that we know we don't know. But there are also unknown unknowns. There are things we don't know we don't know..

artelagro
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Re: A different Bass

Post by artelagro » Tue Oct 27, 2015 11:36 am

I can't see any benefits. The only explanation I would guess is that he (Mozart Allan) was trying to establish a convention for this 'new' Stradella bass system. In these early days I think you had your choice of two main publishers of Scottish and other traditional music i.e. Mozart Allan or James S Kerr, both of Glasgow.
The book is entitled Allan's Reels, Strathspeys and General Dance Music. Country Dances, and cost 3/6net (17.5p)
The lot contained another book by the same publisher entitled Allan's Ballroom Companion and cost 5/- (25p). In this one, the Numerical Bass Notation has been dropped so I would assume that the idea never caught on.
It's all guesswork - unless you know differently.
Garth

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