Astor Piazzolla

Moderator: Glenn

Post Reply
hatless

Astor Piazzolla

Post by hatless » Fri May 17, 2013 11:16 pm

I'm not sure if he counts as Jazz or Blues, but he doesn't seem to fit anywhere else.

I recently bought a CD of Japanese accordionist Mie Miki ("S'il vous plait") playing various short pieces including four by Piazzolla. He plays the Bandoneon, but the pieces she plays seem to have been arranged for piano or accordion by various people. At least one of them was originally a song, I think.

Any way, I love them. There are some delightful tunes, wonderful effects, and some great improvisatory passages. The four pieces are S'il vous plait, Chiquilin de Bachin, Chau Paris, and La Bicicleta Blanca.

Can anyone point me towards some Piazzola music? I like it enough to buy a book of music if there's something I could make sense of on my accordion.

User avatar
Glenn
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 2560
Joined: Tue Apr 30, 2013 9:31 pm
Location: The Netherlands
Contact:

Re: Astor Piazzolla

Post by Glenn » Sat May 18, 2013 7:16 am

Hi Hatless,

Off the top of my head I dont have any Piazolla although I have a cd somewhere with some of his more orchestral works.
I love it too. I have seen some of his sheert music in a shop but it was highly complex and beyond me as a player.
Of course there must be simpler arrangements. Will be interesting to try to hunt some down.

Ah.. Just found my copy of "Libertango" but cannot think where I got it from. Internet certainly.
In fact I have two versions, one a Russian one for 3 accordions and the other accordion 1 of a 2 accordion arrangement.

Question....? Is Astor Piazolla jazz/blues or classical?
1) Ballone Burini 46C (4+5) cassotto (LMMH) 3/3 PA; 2) Accordiola Piano V (5+5) cassotto (LMMMH) 3/3 PA;
3) Roland FR8X; 4) Hohner Vox 4k (LMMH) 3/3 CBA

hatless

Re: Astor Piazzolla

Post by hatless » Sat May 18, 2013 8:33 am

Yes, it may be very complicated, and I'm a complete novice. However it's never stopped me tackling difficult stuff on the piano. You improve rapidly when you stretch yourself.

I fear, though, that what I really need are Mie Miki's own arrangements, and they may not even be written down.

simonking
Star
Star
Posts: 308
Joined: Sun May 05, 2013 1:43 pm
Location: Bristol, England

Re: Astor Piazzolla

Post by simonking » Sat May 18, 2013 9:14 am

Her CD was cd of the week on radio 3 in the morning not long ago, it was excellent but I still haven't got round to buying the CD.

I have two books of Piazzolla pieces, one is called Vuelvo al Sur arranged by James Crabb, and the other is El Viaje arranged by Karen Street I think. Both are easily available and about a tenner each. There are also some arrangements by Frank Marocco in other books.

I can write more when I get to a computer instead of on this stupid phone...

hatless

Re: Astor Piazzolla

Post by hatless » Sat May 18, 2013 12:37 pm

It was Radio 3 that inspired me to buy the CD. It's great. There are a couple of tiny little pieces by Rameau that are just fantastic, and a piece by John Zorn that I love - a sort of collage of snatches of well known tunes. But it's the Piazzolla that continues to grow on me. When you get to a proper keyboard, I'd love to hear more about the books you have. Are they 'accordion ready' arrangements?

hatless

Re: Astor Piazzolla

Post by hatless » Sat May 18, 2013 12:43 pm

I've just looked them up and I see that they are indeed accordion arrangements.

simonking
Star
Star
Posts: 308
Joined: Sun May 05, 2013 1:43 pm
Location: Bristol, England

Re: Astor Piazzolla

Post by simonking » Sat May 18, 2013 7:31 pm

Yes, those two books are properly arranged for accordion as you've found out. As with most books I buy though, I only end up learning one or two pieces properly...
I also like throwing myself in at the deep end to see what happens - it's probably not the ideal way if you want to play very properly but none of us have got forever to learn. There are some left hand parts in those arrangement which will quickly teach you all sorts of combinations and things that can be done on the stradella bass. "Pedro Y Pedro" from the second book is a nice one to learn and is played at a free tempo, which makes things slightly easier.

Other pieces I've got (arranged by Frank Marocco) are Adios Nonino, Jeanne Y Paul, Libertango (OK, not a fantastic arrangement though) and Oblivion.

Other stuff I have are the "Three Preludes" (Flora's, Sunny's, Leija's) arranged for fiendishly difficult free-bass accordion by Richard Galliano, as you'll find on his album "Solo". I don't have a free bass instrument, so I'm doubly stumped in trying to play these - really I bought the music to keep in a drawer for the next ten years until I get good enough to have a go.

You might also like some Richard Galliano original compositions (e.g. Tango pour Claude, Spleen) - greatly influenced by Piazzolla, avaiable in the German "Akkordeon Pur" series of books (there is also a Piazzolla book in that series). But again, these arrangements are bloody difficult to play properly!

Simon.

User avatar
Anyanka
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 1518
Joined: Wed May 01, 2013 5:59 pm
Location: Reigate, Surrey
Contact:

Re: Astor Piazzolla

Post by Anyanka » Mon May 20, 2013 2:25 pm

Glenn wrote:
Question....? Is Astor Piazolla jazz/blues or classical?
Jazz. That term covers a multitude of sins styles.

Apart from the fantastic Libertango (which has suffered from over-exposure, because it's just such a brilliant piece), I really like the Suite Punta Del Este. Quite avant-garde, really.

User avatar
nathen
Expert
Expert
Posts: 169
Joined: Fri May 03, 2013 4:12 pm
Location: Vancouver Canada BC

Re: Astor Piazzolla

Post by nathen » Mon May 20, 2013 4:29 pm

FThis whole discussion has reinded me of my love for tango bandoneon music, thank you for that. My wife and I spent a lot of time learning to dance the tango. In fact I was so inspired by Piazzorolla that I was going to get a bandoneon and start learning to play it.

You've all guessed by now that I love playing new instruments. I usually spend two years of intense study, then when I can play tunes, I want another one. Except for the piano that is, which I have played on and off since I was eight. My father was a professional piano player. I watched him all the time and basically copied him. No lessions, just played by ear.

My daughter went down to Buenos Aires and brought me back a stack of bandoneon cds. I just love the style of music, both the original milonga style and the modern interpretations. I tell myself I've got tons of years ahead to do whatever I want. I blame my continually switching instruments on the music courses I took at university to be able to form and teach orchestras in the school system here. I had to learn five instruments. I loved it so much I haven't been able to stop! Hence my signature 'jack of all trades...'

I am going to get some bandoneon music and have a go at it. Thanks to the generous contributions of the forums members, I get quite inspired by the wide range of music discussed on the forum.

Thanks again

Nathen
Life is not as serious as my mind makes it out to be.

User avatar
Anyanka
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 1518
Joined: Wed May 01, 2013 5:59 pm
Location: Reigate, Surrey
Contact:

Re: Astor Piazzolla

Post by Anyanka » Mon May 20, 2013 4:43 pm

Nathen, do you stop playing your previous instruments? I have to confess that I'm always a bit greedy for new musical toys, too - but hang on, I'll start a new thread on "what else do you play".

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests