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Re: country music

Posted: Mon Jul 17, 2017 3:13 pm
by JeffJetton
TomBR wrote:
Sun Jul 16, 2017 4:07 pm
As I understand it, when Floyd Cramer and others were developing a country style for piano they adopted the "slip-note" style [...] as an imitation of a guitar hammer-on. Country styles have often spread from one instrument to another. Cross picking mandolin as banjo imitation comes immediately to mind.
I always figured that slip-note was based on steel guitar licks, but you could be right (since it is more of a discrete note change rather than a true pitch bend).

Anyway, you see this in Scottish and Irish traditional music too, where the idiomatic ornamentation used by button box and fiddle players grew out of what pipers had long been doing. Adding another level to that, some of the ornamentation you'd typically do when playing Irish music on a piano accordion is imitative of the limitations of the button box. (You wouldn't play an E grace note before a D, for example, but rather an F#.)

And I've heard that when jazz accordionist Art Van Damme was honing his craft, he mainly listened to clarinet player Bennie Goodman.

Point being, if you want to play in a certain style, it would behoove you to listen to all sorts of practitioners of that style, regardless of the instrument. Especially if those instruments have been doing it longer than yours. :)

Re: country music

Posted: Mon Jul 17, 2017 4:51 pm
by henrikhank
Thanks for the clarification.
Would be interesting to hear/see someone playing a left hand/right hand country comping on the accordion. Would be awesome to hear an old cowboy comping.

Re: country music

Posted: Thu Jul 20, 2017 11:33 am
by henrikhank
Does anyone know the difference between country and polka comping?
Both seem to have 1-5 in the bass with chords on the off beats. So how do they differ?

Re: country music

Posted: Thu Jul 20, 2017 4:44 pm
by JeffJetton
henrikhank wrote:
Thu Jul 20, 2017 11:33 am
Does anyone know the difference between country and polka comping?
Both seem to have 1-5 in the bass with chords on the off beats. So how do they differ?
They're not very different at all, actually.

In polka it's common to "flip flop" the basses on the V7 chord. That is, play the alternate bass first in the pattern, making it 5th-chord-root-chord rather than root-chord-5th-chord.*

In country, that's much less common. You're usually going to play the root of the chord first always, whether it's the V7 or not.




*I suspect this is for two reasons:

First, quite often the V7 chord is preceded by the I chord. If you didn't flip-flop the bass, you'd wind up playing a bass note twice in a row (the 5th of the I chord is same as the root of the V7 chord). Not the worst thing in the world, but not very exciting.

Second, and perhaps more importantly, the V7 chord will nearly always be followed by the I chord. By flip-flopping the V7, you wind up moving to the root of the I chord from the root of the V7 chord, which is a nice, strong, down-a-fifth resolution. If you didn't flip-flop, you'd be approaching that root from just a whole step up, which isn't nearly as strong a bass movement.

Re: country music

Posted: Fri Jul 21, 2017 5:15 am
by AccordionUprising
TomBR wrote:
Sun Jul 16, 2017 4:07 pm
henrikhank wrote:
Sun Jul 16, 2017 2:47 pm
TomBR wrote:
Fri Jul 14, 2017 11:52 am

Why What???
??? :?
Tom
I didn't understand why I should imitate a fiddle player when playing accordion.
Sustain and dynamics: Accordions are reed instruments, with different characteristics than both percussive and bowed strings like pianos and fiddles. Button-box players based a lot of their styles on imitating fiddles in all sorts of traditions. So taking inspiration from them and also other reed instruments should be useful.

Lots of the old-school western accordionists did a lot of pads and such which sound to me more like reed or string parts. They were the synths of their day, often played with piano too, so not doing the same thing.

There were a lot of piano players who took up accordion when it was popular, but just because the keyboard was the same didn't make them great players. I think on the right track to develop a "country" style on the instrument that uses the accordion's unique characteristics.

(Note that I don't claim to be a player, just an obsessed listener/history geek, so many grains of salt are worth adding to anything I say.)

Re: country music

Posted: Fri Jul 21, 2017 10:49 am
by george garside
AccordionUprising wrote:
Fri Jul 21, 2017 5:15 am
TomBR wrote:
Sun Jul 16, 2017 4:07 pm
henrikhank wrote:
Sun Jul 16, 2017 2:47 pm

I ]
Lots of the old-school western accordionists did a lot of pads and such which sound to me more like reed or string parts. They were the synths of their day, often played with piano too, so not doing the same thing.

There were a lot of piano players who took up accordion when it was popular, but just because the keyboard was the same didn't make them great players. I think on the right track to develop a "country" style on the instrument that uses the accordion's unique characteristics.

(
1. What are a lots ( or ?even a few) ''of pads'' ??

2. As I have said before somewhere on this forum on a piano its how you press the keys that matters and on a box its how you let go of them that's important

george

Re: country music

Posted: Sun Jul 23, 2017 5:23 pm
by JeffJetton
To play a "pad" is merely to play sustained background chords, rather than to comp with any sort of pattern or play riffs or fills or anything. It fills in the sound with a sort of a harmonic bed (or pad!).

(You'll often see synthesizer presets called things like "string pad", "vox pad" and the like. That's where I first encountered the term at least.)