Bass heavy vs light fingering

To discuss / ask questions about learning methods/styles/teachers/techniques etc.
Geronimo
Superstar
Superstar
Posts: 865
Joined: Tue Nov 28, 2017 11:00 am
Location: Germany

Re: Bass heavy vs light fingering

Post by Geronimo » Thu Apr 12, 2018 8:17 pm

VicAccoFun wrote:
Thu Apr 12, 2018 8:03 pm
Geronimo wrote:
Thu Apr 12, 2018 9:01 am
...
It might make sense to let a teacher look over what you are doing before you get used to something unhealthy and/or counterproductive.
You know - that's something I feel is quite relevant to learning how to play accordions.
Even violin seems to be overall easier in self-teaching.
Violin? Seriously? That's the least anatomical instrument of all. So many ways to cramp up and/or lock joints and/or have it slide around. Without a teacher getting to a stance that will hold up for hours and will allow for vibrato, trills, spiccato, position changes and gives you continuous tone control and quality over the full length of the bow: good luck with that.

VicAccoFun
Novice
Novice
Posts: 19
Joined: Thu Mar 29, 2018 12:06 pm
Location: Tallinn

Re: Bass heavy vs light fingering

Post by VicAccoFun » Thu Apr 12, 2018 9:16 pm

Geronimo wrote:
Thu Apr 12, 2018 8:17 pm
...
Violin? Seriously? That's the least anatomical instrument of all. So many ways to cramp up and/or lock joints and/or have it slide around. Without a teacher getting to a stance that will hold up for hours and will allow for vibrato, trills, spiccato, position changes and gives you continuous tone control and quality over the full length of the bow: good luck with that.
No problem if you know what to do. There is only one correct way to play it and it simplifies the learning process.

Geronimo
Superstar
Superstar
Posts: 865
Joined: Tue Nov 28, 2017 11:00 am
Location: Germany

Re: Bass heavy vs light fingering

Post by Geronimo » Fri Apr 13, 2018 8:39 am

VicAccoFun wrote:
Thu Apr 12, 2018 9:16 pm
Geronimo wrote:
Thu Apr 12, 2018 8:17 pm
...
Violin? Seriously? That's the least anatomical instrument of all. So many ways to cramp up and/or lock joints and/or have it slide around. Without a teacher getting to a stance that will hold up for hours and will allow for vibrato, trills, spiccato, position changes and gives you continuous tone control and quality over the full length of the bow: good luck with that.
No problem if you know what to do. There is only one correct way to play it and it simplifies the learning process.
Well, I took about a decade of lessons distributed over a few decades of my life and if there is "only one correct way to play it", it is likely not to open the case at all. Other than that, there is a wide continuum of different manners depending on violin and player anatomy that make some sense. Many folk players I see, for example, don't use the pinky on their bow hand and without a proper counterbalance are confined to the upper 75% of the bow. Are you going to tell "not correct" to somebody earning his keep and then some with his violin?

VicAccoFun
Novice
Novice
Posts: 19
Joined: Thu Mar 29, 2018 12:06 pm
Location: Tallinn

Re: Bass heavy vs light fingering

Post by VicAccoFun » Fri Apr 13, 2018 5:36 pm

Geronimo wrote:
Fri Apr 13, 2018 8:39 am
... Many folk players I see, for example, don't use the pinky on their bow hand and without a proper counterbalance are confined to the upper 75% of the bow. Are you going to tell "not correct" to somebody earning his keep and then some with his violin?
Yep, they are doing it the wrong way. They also bend their wrist inward thus limiting and restricting their hand mobility. That's why they play in the first position exclusively.
- If someone holds an accordion upside down and plays bass notes with their RH and the piano keyboard with the LH that shouldn't be a problem unless it restricts a player in some way.
- However with a violin played stuck in the first position with the wrist bent inward that's a different story: it's clearly a lame way to play the instrument.

By the way, I like our argument. I find it funny. However it leads nowhere and I understand it.
If it sounds good it is good - otherwise it's pointless to argue about music.
Take care!

george garside
Should get out more!
Should get out more!
Posts: 1769
Joined: Sat May 11, 2013 8:05 pm
Location: Isle of Anglesey. North Wales. UK.

Re: Bass heavy vs light fingering

Post by george garside » Fri Apr 13, 2018 7:48 pm

there is indeed a lot to be said for the '' if it sounds good it is good'' principle, particularly in respect of folk/ trad/ jolly tunes/ pop /jazz etc.

The classical ,conservatory, exams and grades brigade must I suppose perforce take matters more seriarsly!

geo :evil: ;) rge

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest