Raul Barboza

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maugein96
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Raul Barboza

Post by maugein96 » Tue Jun 12, 2018 7:38 pm

I used to think that Argentine accordion music was confined to bandoneon, until I discovered this guy, who appeared on the French accordion scene for a while.

I much prefer his renderings of his native chamame music from Argentina.

Not sure if this one qualifies as chamame, but I'm sure Francisco SC will let me know.

Barboza only uses the right accordion shoulder strap and sits with the instrument on his knee. Don't think he'll worry too much, as he made a decent living internationally out of playing, and probably still does.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=88XAi9wnv40

As a bonus here is one of his pupils, Antonio Figueroa, on a 4 row B system CBA. Incidentally he (usually) uses the same bellows strap configuration as Barboza. Argentina's garbage trucks must be full of left hand accordion shoulder straps!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6PgI1Ny4fqQ

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Re: Raul Barboza

Post by Francisco SC » Wed Jun 13, 2018 10:30 am

Two excellent Argentinean accordionists! I'd say it's a chamamé, as you say.

South American borders are quite permeable to music styles, maybe due to the fact that the borders themselves have been changed through the years (especially borders within the Paraná river basin: Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay, Uruguay and Bolivia), maybe also due to people being able to freely move across the borders in a huge territory where for centuries borders have been difficult to control.

The Argentinean 'Chamamé' music style, for example, has been adopted in a large area of Brazil, to a point that many people assume it being of Brazilian origin... same goes for the Paraguayan beautiful 'Guarania' style.

maugein96
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Re: Raul Barboza

Post by maugein96 » Wed Jun 13, 2018 6:16 pm

Years ago I used to listen to a band "Los Paraguayos", and loved the sound of the Paraguayan harp. The band was pretty popular in the UK for a time, when various other South American styles were also introduced via TV.

First time I heard an Andean type band on TV I was blown away by the sound, and I was drawn to the music of South America for ever.

That was when I began to listen to charango players from any country where it was played.

In time I also discovered some nice music from Chile, Argentina, and of course Brazil.

I read somewhere that Chamamé was imported from Europe as a mixture of waltz, polka, and other styles, and that it was referred to as "servant's music". When I discovered Barboza playing it the whole style took on a new meaning, but I convinced myself it could really only be played on a B system CBA, and put it on hold. I now know that isn't the case, but it took a while to discover. The "polca" style takes a bit of getting used to if you are used to European polka, but I love the sound of it regardless.

I never started accordion until I was 32, and decided to go for French musette, which I was into at that time. I played it almost exclusively for years, but eventually got tired of the repetition and gave up. I'm now 65 and looking to start learning new styles to resume playing again. I'm also into Balkan music, although it is rather complex. I'm not saying Chamamé is easy, but it seems to be a bit easier to work out (most of the time).

I know there is probably not a lot of written music for the style. but I can usually pick a fair bit up by ear, so I think I'll maybe try and give it a go. I'll never hope to play anything like Barboza, but it will be nice to start playing again on C system CBA.

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Re: Raul Barboza

Post by Francisco SC » Fri Jun 15, 2018 12:06 pm

May I use this thread for some more Argentinean Chamamé?

Here is a beautiful tune with a story behind. Merceditas:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rmhPgifXuQU

"Merceditas" was Mercedes Strickler Khalov, a country girl with whom the author -Ramón Sixto Ríos- maintained in 1939 a relationship of unrequited love, which inspired the song. He kept witing to her for years, until she stopped writing back. He wrote this song, "Merceditas", which by 1967 became the greatest hit ever in Argentinean folk music. Several decades later, being both elders, Ramón and Mercedes met again. Again, he proposed marriage, but she rejected him once more. They remained in close contact until the death of Rios, on December 25, 1995; his last act was to bequeath to her the royalties of the song. She died at 84, on 2001.

This is a 1958 version:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-vlvbkonqn8

Mercedes and Ramón by the time they met:
Image

Elderly Mercedes "Merceditas":
Image

maugein96
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Re: Raul Barboza

Post by maugein96 » Sat Jun 16, 2018 9:19 pm

Hi Francisco,

Just post on whatever thread you like, and if you want to put a completely new thread on about Argentinian music, the "European Music" board is probably the best option. There has never been a board dedicated to "World Music" in the time I've been on the forum, so if I want to start a thread about Brazilian accordion that's where I have to go.

I had heard the tune before, but was unaware of the history behind it, and many thanks for explaining it to us. I recognise the player in the first track, as a Dr. Jonas? I was unaware of his nationality, and believed he may have been Spanish, as I heard him play a few pasos. However I know realise that pasos also feature in Argentinian accordion music.

The accordion music of South America is seldom discussed on the forum, probably on account of the fact that very few forum members are familiar with it. However, one or two members in the US have expressed an interest.

Some of us are interested to hear and learn about various accordion styles from any part of the world where they are played. As far as I am concerned, any information and background concerning South American music makes a welcome change from the mainstream topics normally discussed on the forum.

I cannot pretend that South American music will be of interest to many forum members, but it is an open forum, and even if there are only a few takers, then that's all that matters. I regularly put posts on about French musette, although there are only two or three forum members who take more than a passing interest in it.

The history and development of Chamamé music appears to be fascinating, with various European styles playing their part, and also the fact that the style has no real "national" frontiers. I find the geography of South America very interesting, and would be very keen to learn more about any of the accordion styles.

Merceditas is a beautiful tune, made all the more interesting by the fact that there are variations of it, and of course your informative description of the history relating to it.

Thanks again, Francisco.

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Re: Raul Barboza

Post by Francisco SC » Wed Aug 01, 2018 1:08 pm

Time for a little more chamamé?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DTdBt9Jh6T8

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Re: Raul Barboza

Post by maugein96 » Wed Aug 01, 2018 6:54 pm

Francisco SC wrote:
Wed Aug 01, 2018 1:08 pm
Time for a little more chamamé?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DTdBt9Jh6T8

Hi Francisco,

Nice clip, thanks. Tostão behaving himself in this one (well almost).

I've asked Admin about a dedicated board on the forum for South American music, but so far no answer.

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